All for Naught: Lennon and McCartney’s Last Recording Session

An excellent, well-researched delve into the mysterious evening when John Lennon and Paul McCartney entered a studio together for the first and only time five years after The Beatles had come to an acrimonious end.

It had been nearly five years since Lennon and McCartney appeared in a recording studio together. The last time around, they were at Abbey Road Studios in London with Harrison and Starr, working on the Abbey Road track “I Want You (She’s So Heavy).” Given all that had transpired since then, those five years might have felt like 25.

Mark Kozelek Wants The War on Drugs to Fellate Him

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Last week, Mark Kozelek seemingly joked that he’d written a song called “War on Drugs: Suck My Cock.”

“I challenge War On Drugs to let me join them onstage and play a hilarious song I’ve written called ‘War On Drugs: Suck My Cock/Sun Kil Moon: Go Fuck Yourself’ at the Fillmore, October 6,” Kozelek wrote in on his website (in a post that seems to have since been deleted), “provided they let me handle the beer commercial lead guitar.”

He wasn’t joking. Kozelek released the song to his Sun Kil Moon website at midnight EST, presumably right before The War on Drugs took the stage at its sold-out show at The Fillmore in San Francisco. In addition to repeatedly inviting the Philadelphia band to “suck my cock,” he talks about the Sun Kil Moon Hopscotch performance where he called the crowd “fuckin’ hillbillies.” (He’s still selling T-shirts emblazoned with the slogan.)

The War on Drugs dudes, Kozelek concedes, are “pretty nice,” but “definitely the whitest fuckin’ band I’ve ever heard.” “Sounded like basic John Fogerty rock,” he sings, and, later: “The War on Drugs loves John Mellencamp.” Also: “Bridge-and-tunnel people love them some War on Drugs.” Burn, yo.

The song is actually, as Kozelek claimed it would be, kind of hilarious — whether it’s intentional or because it paints Kozelek as an increasingly crochety, curmudgeonly dude. For instance, he follows up following up a line about The War on Drugs’ “beer commercial lead guitar” by yelping “Wait, there’s more!” and deploying a harmonized dual-guitar line. After needling the band with “To make three albums, took ’em nine fuckin’ years!,” a canned audience applauds.

It’s not all tongue-in-cheek: He lashes out at Indyweek writer Allison Hussey with the particularly vituperative couplet “Someone got offended and wrote a piece of crap / Some spoiled bitch rich kid blogger brat.” Not cool, Kozzy.

The War on Drugs, meanwhile, have yet to respond with a song called “Sun Kil Moon: Go Fuck Yourself.” I’d pay to hear that one.

Stream the song from Sun Kil Moon’s website, or download it from Pitchfork.

“It was all a bit of a Blur…”

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A handful of the behind-the-scenes pillars of the Blur legacy reminisce about the band’s origins, coming of age, and imminent future. By comparison, the American perspective on Blur is wildly different from pretty much any other country in the world. Even though we know Blur were the titans of the Britpop movement in England, it doesn’t have much effect because the band is still but a blip on our cultural radar. Most Americans only know the “woo-hoo” song played at sporting events. Even at the height of their powers Blur were still playing clubs in the US, which was great for stateside fans like myself. I saw the band seven times in one year and got to meet them not once but twice. I think they were humbled whenever they toured America. Or perhaps a bit confused. I think the amount of time that has passed since the band last toured the US has only served to feed its legend. If Blur were to play shows over here now, I think the venues would be a bit larger. I guess we’ll see.

The Outsiders

Great article in the Ireland’s Independent from Johnny Marr on Outsiders in the Music Industry.

It always came from the outside, from outsiders created in the real world. These people, out of necessity, rejection, frustration and talent, and with vision, built their own ark and sailed it alongside and ahead of the music industry. In doing so they created their own market. They did their own research and development. They did it, and they still do it, in small clubs, playing in front of a few people, supporting other bands, going up and down the country in little vans, they do it in home-made studios, they do it on MySpace, on Facebook. They don’t do it on The X Factor.

Apparently from Marr’s lecture at the University of Salford, entitled Always from the Outside: Mavericks, Innovators and Building Your Own Ark